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20121230
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
't control everything. we invest in stocks of individual companies. in an uncertain environment, few things are better than a company with an honest to goodness turnaround story. one that's not dependent on the doings of congress or the president. take mgm resorts international. mgm for you home gamers, a stock i have not talked about in ages but i think it's time to step up to the plate. largest casino operator in vegas. vegas is hard hit. they have a sizable business in china. center project in vegas that this company was practically -- you couldn't write it off. burdened with vast amounts of debt and then a new ceo came in. he slowly but surely has been fixing mgm's past mistakes including the massive citi center project in vegas that drove the company to the brink of chapter 11. this is a turn that's been years in making but now businesses are starting to come back. you haven't missed anything so this is the moment. let me explain. not long ago it was a real sick customer. took on a ton the debt when las vegas was fabulous place to do business. when the vegas market got annihilate durin
've got a very positive environment given all the other good things that have been said over and above that, that if we go over the cliff, if there's a real possibility, then we'll see consumer incomes go down and like i said earnings expectations are likely to be revised lower, so what do we like fundamentally? >> pretty defensive areas in many cases there? >> i would say that -- >> thank you. we've got to go, guys. thank you for your thoughts and ideas today on our beloved fiscal cliff. >> five days to go and counting before we fall off the so-called fiscal cliff and while there's no deal, more news out of washington and our very own john harwood is there. >> reporter: mandy, we've got a letter from the republican leadership to the president and to the democrats in the senate saying that the house has acted, they passed legislation last year to extend all the tax cuts and to shift the scheduled sequester cuts from defense to domestic programs, but, of course, in urging the senate to act saying, well, we've acted, now it's your turn, we're simply not going to see the democrats take th
, again, to cap public spending, reduce taxes, to create a favorable environment for corporate. and let me say that france has a lot of advantages. nice infrastructure, good infrastructure, demography, people with skills, a good level of education. we can take advantage of that, even compared with our peers so let's do everything we can to -- the benefit of these positive advantages and not be -- not present people to invest in france because they might be afraid of a lack of visibility on the taxpayers or too high taxes. >> but do you think it's sending the right signal to investors when it's threatening to nationalize a factory? >> no, certainly not. these are not the right ones and clearly what an investor needs is, again, confident. immediately going forward, illustrate will not suffer from taxes or a potential threat. the message should be positive for investors, not just french one, but also we have a strategy to reduce stability. >> but do you understand some people could be forced to leave the country because of increasing back pressure? >> there is a lot of debate around that. my
pullback, you probably will do better and you know they'll give us a couple. in this uncertain environment there's nothing better than a good old fashioned turnaround story. mgm gives you a three headed turnaround. clean up the balance sheet, vegas is improving, china is growing too. bet on mgm when the fiscal cliff looms next strike and this as well as all other stocks get hammered. craig in my home state of new jersey. craig? >> caller: how are you doing? >> what's going on, partner? >> caller: calling about expedia. how you feel about that? >> i feel really good about that. i follow this closely. expedia is a good partner of the inn that i own. i know how powerful they are. this consolidates them in europe. is it enough reason to buy expedia? i liked expedia beforehand. i like it even more now. shane in georgia. shane? >> caller: hey, jim. merry christmas. >> same to you. i like the falcons here. i like them. i got julio. j.j. is on my team. he's done fabulous. i know he watches. thank you. go ahead. julio is a close fan of "mad money." >> caller: with the fiscal cliff looming and with
of that is also to educate other ceos about the importance of aviation. you talk about the tax environment. 20% of the price of your ticket is taxation. you talk about, again the regulatory environment. thees a ease of regulation in a deregulated environment. global competitiveness. you talk about the pricing of oil. this is why we're down in washington, really trying to educate and ceos elected are important in this industry. >> you have players trying to take market share. are you seeing impact of private jet companies sprouting up all over the place, trying to get folks to do private jets? >> really not yet. >> not yet. >> what i hear, is it the corporate jet is not available, i'm flying jetblue. i love that compliment. someone flying from teterboro to west palm beach, they are taking care of that corporation. >> good strategy in teterboro, i'll tell that you. >> it works for us. >> thanks so much pch wonderful to see you and merry christmas. happy holidays. you've heard concerns, tax implications, even recession fears if we go over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesm
with other guests as well, that talked about the merger and acquisition environment. it is a glaring lack of activity. i don't want to make too much of it, take a look. you can see how they've done this year. in line with 2010. up ever so slightly from 2011. remember, we have record low borrowing rates in the high yield market, not to mention from banks as well. leverage ratios have crept up, so you can get debt that equals 5.5, or 6, or even more times the company you're acquiring. all of that would argue for more activity on the part of the leverage buyers. we've had jim woolery at jpmorgan saying, yeah, i can cut you a $10 million check. we haven't seen the big deals. one reason, simply put, flow begets flow. when there's a lot of activity, you get even more. there is a company looking to be shed of this business, or achoirs another business, they may look to shed another business as well. that might be an audience that private equity is part of. when you aren't having that level of activity, you may not get even more from the lbo. but something we've run up against lately does seem to
8. the article cites a tough consumer environment in general and strong competition from rivals apple and amazon. >> and joining us now to talk more about this and what's going on in tech land, brian white, he covers tech and capital markets and he's coming to us from hong kong this morning, i believe. good morning to you. >> yeah, good morning, andrew. >> i don't know if you had a chance to see this that "new york times" piece this morning. but i don't know what it portends not only for microsoft but for the other players and others that sell windows devices. >> well, i'll tell you what, you know, we went to taiwan and china in october and the buzz around windows 8 fell off a cliff from the june time period. so there's a lot of enthusiasm in june at the show in taipei. and by october, there was no enthusiasm. so i think a lot of the momentum had been lost and a lot of companies told me, look, it's really a second half of 2013 story. >> so what does that mean, not only for microsoft were but for the hardwaremaker? are being buying products from dell and the like and buying the w
by people. >> is there still a shot for consolidation in this world, in this environment, or in this sort of post too big to fail world nobody wants to try? >> there will be consolidation. when people start getting used to the prices that these places are worth. i mean remember that bank stock investors were used to seeing their institutions get bought and sold at significant multiples of book value. the returns that are coming out of banks today don't justify that kind of price. so when people start getting comfortable with what these institutions are worth they can only earn 8% or 9% on capital and 1% on -- >> we had an analyst on yesterday or the day before who said that the big winner in 2013 among the big banks was going to be jpmorgan. but that the big loser was going to be morgan stanley. do you buy that? >> no. i'm not sure that it's possible to predict that since the new year hasn't even started yet. the idea that jpmorgan could be the big winner, of course it's possible. but jpmorgan is so large and complex i'm not sure that it's possible to make that kind of prediction. >> what
tax environment. for instance, i don't think an investor would say, i'm going to shun higher dividend stocks, because now my tax rate is up. unfortunately, it will be higher, but you still will pursue dividend stocks. >> got it. peter. thank you. happy new year to you. peter anderson of asset management. >>> still ahead, the head of the campaign to fix the debt joins us live. what needs to happen so we can get a deal done and can it done at this meeting the today? also ahead, we're live from the port area of bay young, new jersey, with an update on a possible strike that could affect businesses from texas to massachusetts. also got the houston mayor to tell us how her city is preparing for a strike. futures still a little jittery here this morning. dow down 86. "squawk on the street" back in a minute. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the
in a rising salary environment. how much leverage there is. meaning, if you have all of the labor and costs accounted for, how much business can you do? all right, the one i like to think of is not a lemonade stand but is pretty well known, chipotle. they have legendary fabulous gross margins. they have labor and food and customers. the more customers they can serve per hour, the more leverage they have. the keys to the gross margin in chipotle are the cost of the guacamole, beef, tortillas, labor, and most importantly the number of customers they can push through in a given day. of course, there are dozens of other inputs advertised and leases to the stores. they need as little turnover as possible because the cost of training new employees is tremendous. a huge obstacle to making a lot of money. the former ceo of costco made it clear to us on man occasions on this show. in fact, he was legendary for paying his employees the most and treating them with the best of benefit because it's so important to keep them happy. so the firm doesn't constantly have to train new people. new people were
was raised in a pretty strong faith environment with my family. and i certainly had this at my school. and i don't disagree with you. i think it's all sorts of things, larry. it's the lack of parental guidance, as well. i think it's the breakdown of the social fabric of the family in america and many other countries. but the particular problem for america, which no other country that has the video -- britain has mental health issues, britain has the same videos, the same hollywood movies, britain has all the social problems that america has albeit on a smaller scale. the one thing we don't have is guns. there are no assault weapons allowed for civilians. and guess what? we don't get mass shootings ever. >> you're not against handguns or rifles. >> no, absolutely not. and i fully respect the second amendment and the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. if a father or mother in a house wants to have a handgun or a pistol to defend themselves against an intruder, that is fine by me. i respect your second amendment, but nobody can tell me you need these assault weapons with 100 bullets in a
in this environment here now is mary, managing director with merchant forecast. you are a secret shopper, right? do i understand that correctly? >> come on. we have a team across america and the team is comprised of retail professionals. and they -- monitor stores across -- >> shop for a live. >> they shop for a living. it is a tough life. yes. they -- answer questions for us and compile the data and we publish our reports. >> the numbers that came out today were disappointing. we have now seen retail stocks fall for three days in a row because this holiday season is looking bad. is it that bad? >> it was going into last friday. and -- again, we cover the mall. going into last friday, everybody was panicked. because they weren't seeing the kind of retail -- >> retailers were panic. >> yes. those days before christmas, it spurred up. whether it pulls out the month is another store write. it looks promising for particular retailers. we have some -- we have some bright spots out there. cosmetics is great. we love ulta. lululemon setting the trend for all of that. >> two of my faves so par. >> costume je
seem to be having a negative impact on the environment. >> yeah. michael, i imagine it's difficult to get out and want to spend when you're worried about your taxes going up next year. and how you're going to allocate your budget. i want to ask about some of the places that we did see spending. what were some of the segment groups? was it apparel, electronics? you know, luxury has surprisingly held up a little bit. so where did we see the dollars that were spent go? >> sure. let's start with luxury. luxury nationally had a difficult year because -- primarily because about 20% of luxury retail sales originated out of the new york area. if new york has a difficult season, that's going to be difficult on the overall numbers. that said, in the southeast and the south central regions of the country, luxury sales were up 5% to 6%. so again, it depended where you were. but luxury retail sales did relatively well. other sectors, women's apparel did have a positive year. as well as furniture and furnishing were also up. primarily we think due to the housing market recovery. >> yeah. today a
dividends. they are up close to 14%, and this type of environment, where you're probably going to see another 3% to 5% selloff because of this fiscal announce, fiscal irritation, and when you get that, you should take that money and put it to work. simply because when you look at corporate america, the average company, bill, is generating a 16% to 17% return on equity, record free cash margins and a federal reserve that has the pedal to the metal. what you and i have talked about before repeatedly, $4 in taxes for every dollar in phantom spending cuts. that's fiscal irritation, but the health of corporate america will be what ultimately prevails. >> sounds like david has been reading your book, rick santelli. >> it does. >> big fan of rick. >> this is such a perverse world we live in, okay. let's look as what's happening. down 158 in stocks and that pushed the ten-year yield under 170, okay. >> really. let me get this straight. they can't get a deal on controlling out-of-control debt, so rates go down. i used to trade during graham/rudman and i remember when they couldn't get deficit
environments to really play havoc with it towards the end of the year, and i think a lot of political capital will be spent on what's at hand right now obviously with the fiscal cliff, and obviously what we do with 2013, i don't think that you're going to see a lot of regulation questioned, asked during 2013. >> okay. >> i think this one is one stock that will benefit. you'll see the analysts start to upgrade it. >> that being b of a. >> wait until the dow goes higher on your list for 2013. >> we don't do anything with respect to the theories of the dogs of the dow, but the generic sense of buying laggards for future outperformers is a broad one. higher growth names outperforming versus last year which was more defensive. what you do is look at the real laggards, hp and intel come to mind real quickly. >> right. >> they are down low for very good reasons. they are reason to be the desk top computing is definitely under siege with more mobile computing. the management issues with hp. all of those things need to be ironed out and as a result the stocks have underperformed. >> are you saying you
, dividend paying stocks in this environment, will, i think, be -- >> even with the, you know, our previous segment was talking about potential for big tax hikes on dividends. even with that, you'll still be going for dividend stocks? >> i think so. i heard that segment and i think we will be get an increase but we won't get that full effect going to the maximum tax rates. >> right. we can only hope there. >> looking in that 20% range. >> chad, what are your expectations? >> well, i think you're going to go over the cliff, but you're going to get a mini bargain. any market dislocation you have over the next 15 trading days, i'd be a buyer. in the long run, we have the economy that's improving, stall speed, but that will gradually increase over the course of the year. once you have some more certainty. so, you'll get some capital spending, you'll get retail investors that will be a little bit more optimistic as well as institutional inves or thes will start to click and up their equity allocation. >> where does 2013 end up for the market? >> i'm looking very positive. i'm bullish in premise
. >>? >> you got it, michelle. we're operating in an environment where, quote, uncertainty is the new normal. this is the equivalent of the last-minute christmas shopping to protect assets of going over the fiscal cliff, planners and wealth managers say it's been a banner year especially for estate planning and here's a couple of reason yes. there's a big change coming with the gift tax. right now there's a $5 million exempted and the tax rate is 35%. on midnight on new year's eve the exemption drops to 1 million and the tax rate goes on 55% and the capital gains tax rate expected to increase from 15% to 20% and the brand new 3.8% medicare tax on wage earners above 200,000 a year and a possible future cap on general deductions is all part of that renewed interest and estate planning. among those closely watching what the president and top congressional leaders do over the weekend to avoid going over the cliff, millions of married couples facing a higher tax burden. the bush-era tax law which eliminated the so-called marriage penalty for joint filers is expiring, meaning with couples with nex
'll see prices go up in that environment. a lot of people are not willing to sell. they say the price of my home is still down big time. prices need to go up. >> home prices are in the eyes of the beholder, right? if you're still underwater, you need a dramatic increase in the price of your home in terms of percentages to get back to even. those people aren't going to feel like things are off the bottom. definitely i've seen here in new york city bidding wars on apartments. there have been improvements in some parts of the country. >> the market is percier. i still feel like a loser because of, kayla, what you were saying. i'm still down from where i was. >> you don't want to sell. >> right. anyhow, let's talk about chicago. i'll be there next week with the morning star mutual manager fund of the year. i'm going to find that chicago is going to have the most expensive parking meters in the country. $6.50 per hour down on the loop. four years ago most of the windy city's parking meters cost just 25 cents per hour. this is demand pricing, isn't it, michelle? >> i love it. you let prices
that can cut through all the competing noise in the radio environment to get your call through. >> we use an array of antennas and some really smart computers, and what they do is, when we transmit, we send the information only to your phone. >> you mean there is-- we will reach the day when each cell phone will be perfect, or as perfect as a landline. >> that's exactly right. [ticking] >> coming up, where is cell phone technology going? >> the optimum telephone is one that i think some day is gonna be embedded behind your ear. it's gonna have an extraordinarily powerful computer running the cell phone. >> that's next, when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. [raucous orchestral music] >> what hath marty cooper wrought? let us go for a moment back to the future. >> new york, calling all cars for a preview of tomorrow. >> the cell's precursor, the car telephone, came in right after world war ii. >> a tiny radio transmitter sends your voice out over the airwaves to the nearest central station, where regular telephone operators can connect you with any telephone on land or sea. >> world of wonders.
a tougher business environment in the new year? we will break it down next. and then the impact on the insurance market and we will talk to eric dinallo, the former new york insurance superintendent. >> my name is allen shortal founder of this corporation. if the fiscal cliff doesn't get resolved no question the u.s. economy will go into recession. we closed down our manufacturing in china and relocated it in the usa. for other companies to follow our lead, they need to trust our leaders in washington will actually lead. think outside the box, great incentive for businesses to invest in the u.s. economy. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could
, called the raging bull thesis. the argument we were moving from a trading environment, which they had been talking about for ten years, and moving towards a new secular bull market beginning in 2013. that means you take out the old highs. we still believe that, 1615 who take out the old highs. housing getting better, turning after six years after a horrible recession. we're looking at the energy boom in the country. we're looking at the wireless mobility aspects to technology and we're looking at the -- one other phenomenon is the competitiveness. >> does that bring mom and pop home? >> what will bring mom and pop home ultimately is losing a little bit of money in their bond funds. over $1 trillion in bond funds over the last four years. but if you look at survey work, particularly survey of consumer finance by the federal reserve board, you'll see that people still want to buy equities. that's been true for the survey for the last, you know, 10, 12 years, despite what just happened. most people don't understand this, 35 to 39-year-olds is a cohort of the americans who begin to save f
investors to market and be successful. so what do you do in an environment like this? every individual ought to have a plan. they ought to have a place they're trying to get to. if they're not there now then they ought to have a second plan for how long it takes them to get there, and under what conditions. don't do anything precipitously. individual investors have a knack for making decisions about investing in asset classes at exactly the wrong time. they need to be disciplined. >> all right. balance is another word that sort of irritates me, because when i hear democrats use balance it means higher taxes, when i hear republicans use balance, it means more spending cuts. when you say we need a balanced approach long-term, what are you talking about? >> well, actually, this, i think, is something that investors need to think about. and there are a couple of very smart people writing about the issue. i would say jeremy grantham. but the whole are we coming to the end of an era. in fact i think one of our guests today wrote a piece on this. the end of the era where we could count on 3% averag
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)